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Dr. Warner’s Office Hrs:

Unofficially: usually most times if I'm not zooming. Remind app is best, esp. if it can’t wait.

 

Other Contact Info:

alejandra.p.vargas@lausd.net or Schoology

 

Officially: Mon. 12:40-1:15

..................Weds.-Fri. 2:15-3:00 pm

             

My Teacher Mtgs. (unavailable times):

Mon./Tues. after school and impromptu

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To Join Our Zoom Class

Click here:

AmLitComp per.1, 2, & 3

AP LIT per. 4

Advisory per. H & L

AmLitComp Honors per. 6 

Schedules:

2020-2021 Zoom Bell Schedule

Odd/Even Period Mondays, Schedule

 

* For the safety of our students, students are allowed in class only if their full credentials are recognized. Zoom links/pw's posted sometimes through Remind a few minutes before class. You'll find passwords as well in Schoology & Google Classroom along with the Zoom link.

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* To stay up to date, go to Google Classroom and login. For general info. (syllabi, summer AP instructions, office hrs, etc.), feel free to browse here!  Need to check your grade?  Go here: Schoology.

 

Welcome parents and students!

 

I'm Alejandra Vargas Warner, aka "Alex" to colleagues or Dr. Warner to my students.  I've had a long journey that began teaching first grade students in Los Angeles in my Teach for America days which then evolved to teaching high school students, later college students at Florida State (Go Seminoles!).  Now, finally, I've come back full circle to teaching high school.  

 

If I were to teach college again I'd most likely be in a peaceful but hot and humid tiny town far far way from friends and family and husband and city things.  For a native Californian, hot and humid just wouldn't do.  Plus I really do like my family!  So I chose teaching high school hands down, and now I can live wherever I want, be a ham sometimes, and let my inner teacher nerd shine in a way it doesn't quite shine in other places.  Leave it to teenagers to drive me to it. ("You want us to write for how long?!!")

 
 
 
 
 
 

Classes

Posts

Course Description
AP ENGLISH LITERATURE &
COMPOSITION

This course aims to further develop reading, writing, and critical analysis skills as you actively examine literature, literary criticism, or the many questions posed by a text. A central theme that you should think about throughout your readings is: what makes art great? On the surface, it may not be an important question, but when you consider the lasting impact of literature that changed the world, from the Magna Carta to the famous documents of American democracy to the books that land on national reading lists – we know that writing can have impact. On a personal level, even the most innocuous note from a loved one, written in just the right tone, or with impeccable skill, can make the difference between trusting someone or not. The well-turned phrase or aesthetic components of a resume can get an employer’s attention, or not. So what makes the art of literature great? What makes “literature”? What makes it last? How do we decide who or what deserves our attention as we read? Once we eliminate any sensationalist or trending effects behind a work, why do writers’ works sometimes fail while others surpass an author’s expectations? How can you make your own stories or essays better? How do you convince an audience that they’ve got to read something – that it’s worth their time?

In this class, we will focus on critical analysis of short stories, novels, drama, poetry, or essays on a variety of topics. You will be required to keep a timely reading response journal (both electronic and in print) of readings in which you will answer assigned prompts. These prompts will challenge you to develop a deeper reading of the texts and explore both your personal and scholarly viewpoints on the subjects discussed. They require tasks which will aid in developing your writing skills. At all times, be prepared to discuss any reading or reading response in a full class or small group setting; prepare to constructively evaluate and discuss peer comments.

Participation in discussion is one of the most important elements of this course. Do not assume that lack of discussion will help your AP score. Students learn best through active thinking. Expect class discussion to not always be traditional; it may include triad debates, student-designed questions, five-minute informal writing, collaborative-learning groups, think-pair-share, or whole class dialogues responding to such things like thematic audio-visuals or a gallery walk with student writing displays.

AP English Literature and Composition (aka AP Lit.) emulates college coursework and will challenge you. Take it seriously. Senioritis is not a joke in this class. And colleges, especially the popular ones or the most competitive colleges, have been known to revoke a college acceptance if a student’s GPA drops dramatically in the last report card.
 
Class Texts
1) Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound, & Sense (anthology). Ed. Greg Johnson and Thomas R. Arp
2) Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
3) Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande w/context reading re: border controversy
4) Hamlet by William Shakespeare w/occasional poetry from Emily Dickinson and others
5) Much Ado about Nothing by William Shakespeare in conjunction with Shakespeare’s sonnets
6) Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. Accompanying text focus: women’s rights
7) The Importance of Being Ernest by Oscar Wilde
8) Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, w/occasional poetry, songs, music – esp. from the Harlem Renaissance, ex. Langston Hugh’s “Harlem” (Dream Deferred) and “I, Too” (cf. Walt Whitman’s “I too Sing America”); for thematic comparison, ex.: Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” – power & control theme
9) Shorter texts: short stories, essays, and poetry (fiction/non-fiction, mostly 20th/21st century)
 Course Description
AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION 
 
 AP English Language and Composition aims to replicate first year rhetoric and composition courses at most universities. In this class, you will engage in reading and writing that challenges you to develop deep analytical skills, including critical thinking, synthesis writing, and close reading of varied texts. As you learn to be captivated by diverse texts, you will unfold your academic skills and mature in your ability to provide cogent analysis within compelling, reflective arguments. Using articles from The Bedford Reader, political or influential speeches, as well as other relevant texts, you are expected to develop critical reading skills as you learn to recognize and analyze an author’s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques. Students will evaluate discourse methods such as those found in news and opinion writing, essays, literature, or internet literature.
 
Successful students in this course articulate their views rationally, stylistically, and powerfully as they employ different types of writing techniques on varied subjects. Here, the process of writing is as important as the final product (such as the final draft of an essay). Such process will include heavy revision, drafting, and collaborative stages where both peers and teacher address areas of improvement and weakness in student work. To further foster effective communication, listening, and pacing skills, the class will blend project work, presentations, debates, media analysis, and timed and untimed writing as students conduct informed analytical reading, writing, and research.
COURSE DESCRIPTION
AMERICAN LITERATURE & COMPOSITION, 
HONORS

The purpose of this course is to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through the study of American literature and the many questions posed by a text.  As you read each piece, central questions that you should emerge are:  What makes foundational documents persuasive in history?  What makes good writing?  What makes good writing last?  Why do some stories fail while others surpass an author’s expectations?  How can you make your own stories and essays better?  How do you persuade an audience of your argument and convince them they’ve got to read something – that it’s worth their time?
 
We will focus on critical analysis of individual readings by American authors from both class textbook and smaller paperbacks.  You will also be required to keep a timely reading response journal of assigned readings in which you will answer assigned prompts.  Some of these prompts will challenge you to develop a deeper reading of the texts and explore your personal and scholarly viewpoints on the subjects discussed.  Others require specific tasks which will aid in developing your writing skills.  At all times, be prepared to discuss any reading or reading response in a full class or small group setting.  You will be expected to to constructively evaluate and discuss peer comments.  
 

This class will also provide an intensive study of various literary genres as you explore the writings of American authors and analyze writers’ choices and literary features.  Students will examine thematic connections between works of literature, and will develop their communication skills via persuasive, analytical, and creative writing, as well as by oral commentary and creative presentations.

Course Overview
EXPOSITORY READING & WRITING 3.0
(ERWC) 2019-2020
 
With a Cal State University innovative curriculum, Expository Reading and Writing 3.0 (ERWC) is a twelfth grade English class that employs rhetorical inquiry to further develop critical thinking skills and prepare students for college. The class upholds rigorous reading, writing, and speaking standards as students learn strategies that will help them thrive academically and professionally. According to CSU, ERWC “. . . engages students in the discovery of who they are as persons, the realization of the ways in which they can participate in society, and their development as critical consumers and effective communicators within society.” Course texts focus on foundational documents, drama, full-length books, research, articles on contemporary issues, and concept readings.

Expect the following in this course:
1) The integration of interactive reading and writing processes.
a. reading rhetorically (preparing to read, reading purposefully, and questioning the text)
b. preparing to respond (discovering what you think)
c. writing rhetorically (composing a draft, revising rhetorically, and editing).
By the end of the course, students will have read a range of literary and nonfiction text genres and produced 10- 12 culminating projects, including academic essays, creative writing and performances, and multimedia presentations/research reports, from initial draft to final revision and editing.
2) A rhetorical, inquiry-based approach that fosters critical thinking and engagement through a relentless focus on the text
3) Materials and themes that engage student interest
4) A student-centered approach that emphasizes student agency &metacognition
5) Classroom activities that model and foster successful practices of fluent readers and writers
6) Research-based methodologies with a consistent relationship between theory and practice
7) Teacher support of students’ development as expert learners & responders to instructional contexts
8) Alignment with Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts/Literacy& English Language Development
9) Transferable skills applicable to conceptual development and practice across all modules, e.g., genre awareness, goal setting and self-assessment, rhetorical situation, Aristotelian appeals.
 
Class Texts & Topics
BOOKS (excerpt or whole books used)
1. Catch 22.  By Joseph Heller
2. 1984, By George Orwell
3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. By Mark Haddon
4. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. By Rebecca Skloot
5. Hamlet. By William Shakespeare

TOPICS (Examples)
1) The ERWC 12 Portfolio
2) Bored & Brilliant
3) Brace for lmpact
4) Detecting & Limiting the Spread of Fake News
5) Juvenile Justice
6) Language, Gender, & Culture
7) The Value of Life
8) Pathos as Inquiry: Knowing Your Audience
9) Power of Curiosity: Using Inquiry Questions to Improve Writing
10) Reviewing the Rhetorical Situation
11) Community Activism
12) Waste More, Want More

Course Description
AMERICAN LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

PURPOSE AND COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course aims to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills through the study of American literature, composition, and the many questions posed by a text. As you read in this class, consider central questions: What makes good writing? What makes it last? How do we decide what becomes part of a canon – part of what gets recommended for curriculum reading lists throughout time? Why do some stories fail while others surpass an author’s expectations? How can you make your own stories and essays better? How do you convince an audience that they’ve got to read something – that it’s worth their time?

We will focus on critical analysis of individual readings by American authors. You are required to keep a timely reading response journal of assigned prompts that will include such things as graphic organizers and other formative activities. These prompts will challenge you to develop a deeper reading of the texts and explore both your personal and scholarly viewpoints. Other prompts require specific tasks which will aid in developing your writing skills. At all times, be prepared to discuss any reading or reading response in a full class or small group setting. Be prepared as well to constructively evaluate and discuss peer comments. Participation in discussion and class activities is one of the most important elements of this course.

Expect to engage in works from various literary genres as you analyze writers’ choices and learn to provide insights about the effects of rhetorical and literary features. Students will also examine thematic connections between works of literature while developing communication skills via argumentation, analysis, narrative writing, as well as through oral commentary and creative presentations. Students must complete all major projects and essays to receive an “A” in the class.

AP ENG LANG Summer Assignment

AP ENG LANG Summer Assignment Instructions:

DUE DATE: AUGUST 14, 2018 -- may turn in electronically through google docs in Google Classroom.  To submit on Google Classroom, join the class using this code: s95282

Should a tech issue emerge and another method is needed, you may send your work as well to the following email addresses: alejandra.p.vargas@lausd.net if enrolled in my class (Dr. Warner), or, if you are enrolled in the AP classes of Ms. Avdul or Ms. Arentoft use holly.avdul@lausd.net or mandy.arentoft@lausd.net 

Online submission is preferred unless impossible (we have English teacher aversion to paper clutter).  If necessary, submit a paper copy instead, due at the same time as the online submission on the 1st day of instruction, August 14, 2018.

The Summer Reading Assignment is attached here as a word document if you wish to download now, but it is best to open your copy directly from your Google drive once you join the Summer AP Google Classroom page (Sign in to Google Classroom and use this code to add the class: s95282).  Once you've joined and open the document, an automatic copy will be present in your Google Drive. You may type your answers directly into the google doc provided for you. You may also handwrite your assignment (if necessary). Include a title in your document with: LAST NAME, FIRST NAME, AP LANG SUMMER READING.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: YEARBOOK CLASS
Yearbook is a two‐semester course where students engage in high‐level critical thinking as they blend abstract ideas, technical ability, reading, and enhanced composition skills.  Here you will find your own unique path, as you delve into the artistic, creative, and aesthetic world of the visual and graphic arts and develop communication skills in all of their virtual and physical forms. How each student develops these skills is unique to that individual.  This class will also challenge you to master the writing and editing of stories that matter, so that our story -- our Kennedy story -- may reveal itself this year in compelling and dynamic ways. Thus you will read and analyze relevant material and develop expository writing and interviewing skills as you also learn and practice design and layout; analyze and evaluate images; learn communication, management, and evaluation skills; use word processing and design software; and demonstrate knowledge and understanding of ethical journalism. Expect self‐directed learning and confidence gained as you promote your creative ideas and see them rise to their completion and potential.

To save, buy 2016 yearbook before Jan.1 at: https://yearbookforever.com/#school/325255/2016



LINK DESCRIPTION: YEARBOOK PUBLICATION
A site containing Yearbook notes and updates for all Cougars. Sales have begun. (Prices 10-15 percent lower than surrounding schools)  
 
Welcome to Yearbook!
Dr. Warner - Sponsor
Dear Cougars, 
 
Please support our Yearbook sales.  Although it might seem expensive, our book is purposely sold 10-15 percent lower than surrounding schools.  We do not seek to make a profit and in fact have not broken even every year.  Yearbook is a service to our Kennedy community, and as such, we hope you will enjoy all the hard work and effort that goes into putting one together.
 
Yearbook with Senior Package:  $90 
Yearbook Price until Jan. 1, 2016:  $100
After Jan. 1, 2016:  $110.
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENGLISH LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT 2
In ELD 2, students will develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills that enable them to move up to ELD 3 and standard English language arts instruction. The course is part of a sequence of courses designed to move students who are new to English into regular English language arts instruction within a two to three-year period. While our curriculum includes the High Point Program, be prepared to engage in supplemental readings and essay tasks that present a more nuanced and targeted approach to learning language skills and composition strategies. Students who enroll mid-semester or who do not master course standards may not have had adequate time or exposure needed to gain English proficiency. They may therefore repeat the course the next semester. A student should not repeat this course more than once unless it is determined that appropriate academic intervention is needed for the student to catch up.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: ENGLISH 9 focuses on analytical reading and writing while simultaneously familiarizing students with diverse writing styles and literary genres. Within this framework, you will explore themes in literary and expository texts.  You will write about the literature we read and much class time will be devoted to practicing and developing critical thinking, reading interpretation, and the essay-writing process.  Specific practices in the class include pre-writing, free writing, and multiple revisions, all of which lead to a polished (but never “final”) product. Vocabulary and contextual grammatical instruction will enhance student understanding during each unit of study.